Apartheid Black Like Water Shirt

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Apartheid Black Like Water Shirt

40.00

Photographer Margaret Bourke-White’s documentary-style depictions of South Africa during Apartheid captured the “vicious system” she sought to expose to the world. “Aparteid” is an Afrikaans word meaning "the state of being apart" and was a government-suppported system of racial   segregation in South Africa from 1948 to 1994.

Margaret Bourke-White (1904 - 1971) writes to a friend at the end of her four months stay in the country, “[South Africa] left me very angry, the    complete assumption of white superiority and the total focusing of the whole country around the schemes of keeping black labor cheap, and           segregated, and uneducated, and without freedom of movement.” 

In 2013 Alex Lichtenstein, associate professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of History at IU Bloomington, curated an exhibition with rare photohraphs taken by Bourke-White in South Africa in 1950 including the photograph depicted here. “She wanted to use     photography to emphasize social justice, human rights and the dangers of racism,” Lichtenstein said. “That sort of documentary photography to try and show what’s going on remains relevant.”

 

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