September 1st, 1971 Snapback

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September 1st, 1971 Snapback

40.00

On September 1st, 1971 the Pittsburgh Pirates made history with the Major League’s first all-minority starting lineup 24 years after Jackie Robinson became the first black player to join the league. Some players immediately noticed the importance of the moment whereas others did not realize until the middle of the game. The event’s significance received little media attention at the time.

During that era of baseball, it was rare for Major League managers to put black and Latino pitchers and catchers on their roster in the prejudicial notion that they couldn’t play the “thinking man’s game”. But Danny Murtaugh’s diverse Pirates lineup did not conform to that idea and included players like pitcher Dock Ellis and catcher Manny Sanguillen. As a manager Danny only cared about ability and talent, and his team’s progressive environment was influential to the entire sport. When his minority-heavy roster won the World Series that season in 1971, the first of two championships for the Pirates in the ‘70s, a message was sent to other teams: do not discriminate or else risk losing out on the opportunity to draw from an entire pool of talent. 

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